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Tag: Hack

macbookOS XSecurityUncategorized

When Was The Password Last Changed On This Mac?

In one more of these wonderful scripts that can do crazy things,  philastokes from APPLEWRITERHELPER, has handed you the keys to the kingdom. With this simple script, you can find our the last time the passwords for a set number of users was changed on a Mac running OS. And that right from your Terminal.

Sometimes it can be useful to know when the user’s password was last changed. For example, you might want to enforce a policy of having users (or yourself!) change login passwords after a given period. Alternatively, if you or one of your users is experiencing login difficulties, you might want to check that the password […]

#one liner command line to get last password set times for all users on the mac

# see http://applehelpwriter.com/2018/03/14/6228
echo; echo Password Last Changed:; u=$(dscl . list /Users | egrep -v ‘^_|daemon|nobody’); for i in $u; do printf \\n$i\\t; currentUser=$i;t=$(dscl . read /Users/”$currentUser” | grep -A1 passwordLastSetTime | grep real | awk -F’real>|</real’ ‘{print $2}’); date -j -f %s “$t” 2> /dev/null; done

via how to find when the login password was last changed —

Local Session Manager
Little TipsNetworkingRDS - Remote Desktop ConnectionWindows Server Tips

How To Find Out All Remote Desktop Logon Sessions That Took Place On Windows Server 2012 R2

The first time I used these logs is when I was running an audit to figure out whether a specific user has recently accessed my server using Remote Desktop Connection.

In order to identify who has recently had a full session remotely running on your server, you: look at the events located at these two places:

Event Viewer > Application and Service logs > Microsoft > Windows > TerminalServices – Local SessionManager > Operational

and

Event Viewer > Application and Service logs > Microsoft > Windows > TerminalServices – RemoteConnectionManager > Operational

To have any events logged in here, you have to at least have these things in place:

  • You must be running the Windows Feature AppServer (Terminal Services Application Server)
  • The specified logs must be enabled.

With these conditions in place, these logs show give you the user names and computer names of all Remote Desktop sessions that have taken place between your computer and other client devices for a certain duration of time. Of course the length of the log depends on the properties you have set for the logs (e.g. Enabled logging, Maximum log size, what to do when maximum event log size is reached, etc.).

Please note that these logs can also be used to diagnose and troubleshoot RDS sessions that disconnect in an apparently random way.

One other place you can check is your Event Viewer > Windows Logs > Security which should have audit log of successful and failed logons if you had activated the “Audit logon events” in Local Computer Policy > Computer Configuration > Windows Settings > Security Settings > Local Policies > Audit Policy snap-in.

Finally, a rather simple way you can go about it is by using the command line as an administrator and typing the following command (more about it at the Windows Command Line reference below):

net user  username | findstr /B /C:"Last logon"

Do you know of any other ways to achieve this audit? Please let us know in the comment section.

Some other useful resources include:

Beware of Phishing Emails
AntivirusLittle TipsSecurity

Security Warning – Beware of Emails About Uber

Hello, Friends,

Uber has suffered a data breach a year ago, and the address and email information of 57 million people were stolen. Uber paid off the hackers who then supposedly deleted the data, but that cannot be confirmed.

Watch out for phishing emails related to this Uber data theft, for instance that your “Uber account was compromised” and that you need to change your password, or anything else related to Uber that could be suspicious.

Never click on a link in an email for situations like these, always go to the website yourself through your browser’s address bar or a bookmark you have set earlier.

Remember, Think Before You Click!