Tag: hijacking

Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) Vulnerability Paper
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Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) Vulnerability – All Your Wi-Fi Devices Might Need A Security Patch

UPDATE3: On a website dedicated to the “Key Reinstallation Attacks,” https://www.krackattacks.com/, the researcher who brought attention to this vulnerability describes what it is, presents a demo of the attack against an Android device as client, and suggests practical steps in a rich Q&A article.

UPDATE2: More companies have updates available. Microsoft also has released an update for client devices. (Source: Pileum Corporation)

If you have a Meraki access point, they have released a patch to address this issue. See below link for more information.
If you have an Aerohive access point, they have released a patch to address this issue. See below link.
SonicWALL has announced that their firewalls and access points are not vulnerable to the flaws in WPA2.
Cisco has released patches for some of their products that are affected. You can check for those products and updates as they are released here:
Microsoft has released a patch that provides additional protection on the client workstation. We recommend that this be installed on all workstations immediately.

UPDATE1: Several Wi-Fi AP manufacturers have started developing and releasing Updates. Please check the CERT website below for updates. One of the most recent ones is Meraki access point.

In a research paper titled “Key Reinstallation Attacks: Forcing Nonce Reuse in WPA,” Leuven, Belgium researchers Mathy Vanhoef and Frank Piessens just proved that WPA2 handshake traffic can be manipulated to induce nonce and session key reuse. Here is an overview of the announcement from CERT:

Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) handshake traffic can be manipulated to induce nonce and session key reuse, resulting in key reinstallation by a wireless access point (AP) or client. An attacker within range of an affected AP and client may leverage these vulnerabilities to conduct attacks that are dependent on the data confidentiality protocols being used. Attacks may include arbitrary packet decryption and injection, TCP connection hijacking, HTTP content injection, or the replay of unicast and group-addressed frames.

The simplest solution is to install updates provided by your Wi-Fi device vendor.

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