Networking

Remote Desktop Services – Resource Sharing

Microsoft Windows comes with some interesting features to help manage how computer resources are shared among users using Remote Desktop Services. I first came across this feature on Windows Server 2012 R2 when I noticed that one of my users’ session was, pretty much out of the blue and quite often, disrupted by the server.

Most of the time it takes resetting their connection to the server for them to be able to reconnect and use the server resources–network, storage, or processor, but sometimes just a fresh attempt to reconnect the usual way just works.

To figure out what this was happening, I looked no farther than the log files to find the log message “Remote Desktop Services Network Fair Share was disabled for the user account DOMAIN_NAME\username” in the Event Viewer under Microsoft/Windows/TerminalServices-Remote Connection Manager/Admin.

A solution is suggested by a technet article, but the description is for Windows Server 2008. One has to find the equivalent for Windows Server 2012. The article suggests the following under Fair Share CPU Scheduling.

Fair Share CPU Scheduling is a new feature included with Remote Desktop Services in Windows Server 2008 R2. Fair Share CPU Scheduling dynamically distributes processor time across sessions based on the number of active sessions and load on those sessions by using the kernel-level scheduling mechanism included with Windows Server 2008 R2. On an RD Session Host server, one user will not affect the performance of another user’s session, even if the RD Session Host server is under a high load.

Fair Share CPU Scheduling is enabled by default. You can disable this feature by configuring the following registry entry to 0:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\SessionManager\DFSS\EnableDFSS .

Finally, trying to solve this led me to an even more interesting article describing Resource Sharing in Windows Remote Desktop Services:

From the Server 2012 RC Whitepaper, the 2012 fair share experience:

  • Network Fair Share. Dynamically distributes available bandwidth across sessions based on the number of active sessions to enable equal bandwidth usage.
  • Disk Fair Share. Prevents sessions from excessive disk usage by equal distribution of disk I/O among sessions.
  • CPU Fair Share. Dynamically distributes processor time across sessions based on the number of active sessions and load on these sessions.

The latter article also includes cool screenshots you should check out.

AntivirusBackup

Windows Server Backup – What To Do When Your Antivirus Locks Up Your Files

It happens sometimes that your favorite antivirus locks up your files every time your backup engine tries to access them for, well, backup. You may want to contact customer support for your specific antivirus. In my case, Bitdefender had set itself to protecting my files so much that my scheduled backup failed, failed, and failed… and failed again. So, I ask Bitdefender customer support for a quick guide on what to do. Following is what they said. It turns out to be what worked as well.

Most likely there is some interference with the backup process, adding an exclusion for the backup application process in the Antimalware > Settings section of your policy might fix the situation, I provided the steps below.
  1. Log in to Bitdefender Control Center.
  2. Go to Policies page.
  3. In case you already have a custom policy created, click on it in order to edit. Otherwise, click the + Add button to create a new policy.
  4. Go to Antimalware > Settings tab.
  5. Select Custom Exclusions.
  6. Choose Process from the Type menu.
  7. In the Files, folders, extensions or processes column, type the full path to the application you want to exclude from scanning.
  8. Choose On-access from the Modules menu and click the “+” button to add the application to the exclusions list.
  9. Repeat steps 4 to 8, but select ATC/IDS from the Modules menu.
  10. Click Save to send the policy to the target machines.

The wbadmin.exe and wbengine.exe files might be the ones for which you need to create the exclusions.

And yes, they were and they worked after I followed the steps. ‘Nough said!

I really couldn’t find a Bitdefender image with free license for reuse with modification, but I found this one about Ebola. So, let’s just learn

how-the-ebola-virus-attacks

How the Ebola virus attacks according to the WHO

 

Disk Management

Windows – Change Drive Letters and Paths…

If you are like me, there are things you do not think you will ever need until you actually need them. This is what happened when I found myself needing to claim the J: drive letter from WD Unlocker that had claimed it.

Where I work, we have assigned J:, among many other drive letters, to a specific network shared folder. But somehow, Western Digital’s WD Unlocker program wanted that very J: letter…

Alright, long story short, a I had to claim the letter back after assigning a different one to that letter-thieving software. Here is how:

  1. Open Disk Management. One way of doing it is to Run diskmgmt.msc
  2. Right mouse click on the volume that has the letter you need
  3. Click Change Drive Letter and Paths.
  4. Select the drive letter you want to rescue
  5. Click Change
  6. From the dropdown list select a new letter you want to assign to the mischievous volume. Please review some precautionary measures in your choice of letters.
  7. Validate the choice, and boom!

You are done! The captive letter is no longer captive.

faq-2-2

How to Change Drive Letter and Paths on a MS Windows 7 or a MS Windows Server 2012 R2 system.  Image source: http://www.windowsfaq.ru

Links:

Other and maybe more interesting links:

NetworkingWindows 10 Tips

Windows 10 – Change Network Type to Private

In Windows 10, once you are connected to the network you want to set to Private,

  1. Start a Windows Explorer window
  2. Click on “Network” among the items listed on the left of the window
  3. If you have disallowed sharing on Public Networks (recommended) and allowed on Private, there should appear a (yellow) warning in the upper part of the Explorer window to remind you that “Network discovery and file sharing is turned off. Network computers and devices are not visible. Click to change…”
  4. Click on the warning
  5. Respond appropriately to the new pop-up asking if you actually want to allow sharing on Public (NO), or change network to a Trusted/Private network.
  6. Select second option to change network to a Private/Trusted one.
Windows 10 Pop-up message to enable network discovery and file sharing on Private Network

Windows 10 Pop-up message to enable network discovery and file sharing on Private Network. A good way to change network from Public to Private

 

Similar article for Windows 8.1: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-networking/change-type-to-private/97993d60-58e0-4536-a31e-df89cccb7fe1?auth=1