Category: Networking

NetworkingWindows Server Tips

Can’t Find Server in Network

You have installed Windows Server 2008 R2, you have installed the application you want to make available to multiple endpoints on your LAN (Local Area Network), and you have even created your Share on the server. Good!

Then comes the time to setup the endpoints or client computers that will consume your application, but there is one problem, Ma’am/Sir! You cannot find the Share on the network. In fact, you cannot even find your server on the network!! What do you do?

You go to your Services on the server and enable the service named Computer Browser. This service is disabled by default. So, turn it on and you are good to go! Go check on the endpoints’ list of network devices on your LAN and you should see your server there. If you do not, please leave a comment here.

Some external help here from the people at Websense:

1.Make sure that Windows Network File Sharing is enabled.
  a.Go to Start > Network > Network and Sharing Center.
  b.In the Sharing and Discovery section, set File Sharing to On.
2.Go to Control Panel > Administrative Tools > Services.
3.Double-click Computer Browser to open the Properties dialog box.
4.Set the Startup type to Automatic.
5.Click Start.
6.Click OK to save your changes and close the Services dialog box.

And from the people at Microsoft Technet.

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NetworkingRouters-Modem-Firewalls

RDP to Your Server Behind SonicWall or TP-Link Router

You just completed the installation of your new server. You now have a router in place, probably one of Dell’s SonicWall firewall routers or maybe a TP-Link router. But then you realize that you would like to be able to work from your hotel room or from the coffee store in the neighborhood. But how do you get to your server from outside while there is a firewall in the way?

Thankfully, there is a way to do just that. Well, actually a ton of ways, but we are here going to talk about just one of them: Remote Desktop Connection (or Microsoft Remote Desktop if you are working from a Mac), especially, about the setup to be able to use that program.

This tool enables you to take advantage of terminal services on Windows Servers. You will need to setup your modem and then your router to create a path from the outside world to your server.

Finally now, the moment of truth:
1) I do not think I can explain the setup of Remote Desktop Connection or even Microsoft Remote Desktop better than Microsoft themselves: http://windows.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/connect-using-remote-desktop-connection#connect-using-remote-desktop-connection=windows-7

2) The people at Dell have also explained the setup of the SonicWall better than I ever could this this knowledge base article: https://support.software.dell.com/kb/sw7501

3) Those at TP-Link did their part too: http://www.tp-link.com/en/faq-381.html

So, there you have it. Now you are an expert at how this whole thing works. Don’t thank me if you actually have. Thank the people at Microsoft, Dell, and TP-Link… and the God who created them!

Summary routing from remote desktop to server.

Summary routing from remote desktop to server. Image source: https://support.software.dell.com

Networking

Remote Desktop Services – Resource Sharing

Microsoft Windows comes with some interesting features to help manage how computer resources are shared among users using Remote Desktop Services. I first came across this feature on Windows Server 2012 R2 when I noticed that one of my users’ session was, pretty much out of the blue and quite often, disrupted by the server.

Most of the time it takes resetting their connection to the server for them to be able to reconnect and use the server resources–network, storage, or processor, but sometimes just a fresh attempt to reconnect the usual way just works.

To figure out what this was happening, I looked no farther than the log files to find the log message “Remote Desktop Services Network Fair Share was disabled for the user account DOMAIN_NAME\username” in the Event Viewer under Microsoft/Windows/TerminalServices-Remote Connection Manager/Admin.

A solution is suggested by a technet article, but the description is for Windows Server 2008. One has to find the equivalent for Windows Server 2012. The article suggests the following under Fair Share CPU Scheduling.

Fair Share CPU Scheduling is a new feature included with Remote Desktop Services in Windows Server 2008 R2. Fair Share CPU Scheduling dynamically distributes processor time across sessions based on the number of active sessions and load on those sessions by using the kernel-level scheduling mechanism included with Windows Server 2008 R2. On an RD Session Host server, one user will not affect the performance of another user’s session, even if the RD Session Host server is under a high load.

Fair Share CPU Scheduling is enabled by default. You can disable this feature by configuring the following registry entry to 0:
HKEY_LOCAL_MACHINE\SOFTWARE\Policies\Microsoft\Windows\SessionManager\DFSS\EnableDFSS .

Finally, trying to solve this led me to an even more interesting article describing Resource Sharing in Windows Remote Desktop Services:

From the Server 2012 RC Whitepaper, the 2012 fair share experience:

  • Network Fair Share. Dynamically distributes available bandwidth across sessions based on the number of active sessions to enable equal bandwidth usage.
  • Disk Fair Share. Prevents sessions from excessive disk usage by equal distribution of disk I/O among sessions.
  • CPU Fair Share. Dynamically distributes processor time across sessions based on the number of active sessions and load on these sessions.

The latter article also includes cool screenshots you should check out.

NetworkingWindows 10 Tips

Windows 10 – Change Network Type to Private

In Windows 10, once you are connected to the network you want to set to Private,

  1. Start a Windows Explorer window
  2. Click on “Network” among the items listed on the left of the window
  3. If you have disallowed sharing on Public Networks (recommended) and allowed on Private, there should appear a (yellow) warning in the upper part of the Explorer window to remind you that “Network discovery and file sharing is turned off. Network computers and devices are not visible. Click to change…”
  4. Click on the warning
  5. Respond appropriately to the new pop-up asking if you actually want to allow sharing on Public (NO), or change network to a Trusted/Private network.
  6. Select second option to change network to a Private/Trusted one.
Windows 10 Pop-up message to enable network discovery and file sharing on Private Network

Windows 10 Pop-up message to enable network discovery and file sharing on Private Network. A good way to change network from Public to Private

 

Similar article for Windows 8.1: http://answers.microsoft.com/en-us/windows/forum/windows_7-networking/change-type-to-private/97993d60-58e0-4536-a31e-df89cccb7fe1?auth=1