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Category: Malware

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And That Is How Your TV Is Watching You

Have you ever heard of the term “idiot box?” Maybe they are not that dumb? Smart TV’s are able to watch you watch TV and learn about the devices on the same network in your home. By the way, even if you had never heard of the idiot box term, I am sure you can easily guess that it is the North American word for a television set. At least, that is what Google seems to believe.

idiot box definition by Google

In fact, search of “define idiot box” yielded the definition “a television set.” Marriam-Webster seems to agree as well.

Back to our point, though. Your Smart TV has been reported to spying on you with your consent but, if you are like the majority of Smart TV owners, without your knowledge. So, go ahead and read up on these stories about what Samba TV does with your data and what bad hackers could trick your device into doing. Armed with this knowledge, you will at least be able to understand how in the world did that company know to advertise this or the other product to you.

AntivirusLittle TipsMalwarePhishingSecurity

Spam Alert: These People Never Get Tired Of Trying To Get You

 

Here is little warning and reminder not to get too comfortable thinking that scammers are gone or that your email spam filter is so good they will never get to you. Here is your wake up call: These people never get tired of trying. They use all sorts of means to disguise themselves including shortening their links by means of “short url” machines like in the case of the above picture.

Spam Email Example

Example of an email that hides a dangerous link behind a tinyurl link under the UPGRADE NOW button.

In fact, I just got right in my inbox one of those messages with a malicious link to some phishing scam hosted on https:// [some_malicious_place] .us.archive.org. But the link that was actually in the big blue button was not pointing there directly. It was disguised behind a https:// tinyurl.com/ [some_extension_goes_here]. It took running the link through Google’s online virus scanner virustotal.com to detect that the final destination of the link is an archive.org-hosted malicious content and site.

So, when you get an email that makes you uncomfortable as to why you are getting it or one that it looks suspicious, you probably are right. It is probably suspicious and dangerous. Get your IT friend look at it or just do not click on any links or attachments in it until you can get it verified by someone who has the tools. If you know how to extract the links without activating them, then do that and report the links if malicious to places like virustotal.com or to your antivirus software so they can include it in their next update. Please note that sometimes the email may come from an address of a person you actually know (after their mailbox was hijacked or is being spoofed).

Google is full of resources on how to tell if the email you are looking at is Spam. Seriously. Just type such a question and you will find a plethora of reputable sites with good examples. Emphasis on reputable. Do not fall for more phishing while trying to detect some.

virustotal.com reveals the actual final destination of a tinyurl or Shortened URL.

This screenshot from virustotal.com details page shows us the final URL the tinyurl link or Shortened URL that was in the phishing email would have led to.

What to do when you can't delete a program in Windows
Little TipsMalwareWindows 10 TipsWindows PCWindows Server Tips

How To Manually Uninstall a Stubborn Service in Windows?

There are programs that are not easy to uninstall. Sometimes you can easily uninstall the said programs only to find out that they left a trail of files in C:\Program Files\ or C:\Program Files (86)\ that you then try to manually delete.

If all goes away and leaves your computer alone, great! You do not need this article. This article is for times when the program just won’t go away and reports that there is another system using it or another user currently running the program. If there is no user that you know of and there are not programs you are aware of that are still running the unwanted application:

  1. Try to kill the process in the Applications tab of your Windows Task Manager.
  2. If the problem persists, Check your Services tab of the Windows Task Manager and look for the name of the unwanted application or for anything related to it.
  3. If the application you are uninstalling had a server component, you will find it in the list of Services. (Hint: Sort the list by Name instead of PID you can at least identify the program by name.)
  4. Once you find the problematic service. Right mouse click on it to Stop the service and then try to delete the folder or application you had a hard time deleting.
  5. If that still does not let you remove it, then go ahead and run an elevated command prompt to run sc.exe
  6. The command  sc.exe delete <service name> should help you completely remove or delete the service, where <service name> is the name of the service itself as you see it in the service management console, not of the exe.
  7. Finally try to delete the folder you were attempting to delete from C:\Program Files\ or wherever you had installed the application.
  8. If all none of the above solves the problem, there are certainly other methods out here. Let us know what did the trick for you by commenting below. (Pro Tip: Consider bringing in some of the big guns like the Process Explorer from Microsoft’s SysInternals Utilities).
Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) Vulnerability Paper
AntivirusMalwareModemsNetworkingRouters

Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) Vulnerability – All Your Wi-Fi Devices Might Need A Security Patch

UPDATE3: On a website dedicated to the “Key Reinstallation Attacks,” https://www.krackattacks.com/, the researcher who brought attention to this vulnerability describes what it is, presents a demo of the attack against an Android device as client, and suggests practical steps in a rich Q&A article.

UPDATE2: More companies have updates available. Microsoft also has released an update for client devices. (Source: Pileum Corporation)

If you have a Meraki access point, they have released a patch to address this issue. See below link for more information.
If you have an Aerohive access point, they have released a patch to address this issue. See below link.
SonicWALL has announced that their firewalls and access points are not vulnerable to the flaws in WPA2.
Cisco has released patches for some of their products that are affected. You can check for those products and updates as they are released here:
Microsoft has released a patch that provides additional protection on the client workstation. We recommend that this be installed on all workstations immediately.

UPDATE1: Several Wi-Fi AP manufacturers have started developing and releasing Updates. Please check the CERT website below for updates. One of the most recent ones is Meraki access point.

In a research paper titled “Key Reinstallation Attacks: Forcing Nonce Reuse in WPA,” Leuven, Belgium researchers Mathy Vanhoef and Frank Piessens just proved that WPA2 handshake traffic can be manipulated to induce nonce and session key reuse. Here is an overview of the announcement from CERT:

Wi-Fi Protected Access II (WPA2) handshake traffic can be manipulated to induce nonce and session key reuse, resulting in key reinstallation by a wireless access point (AP) or client. An attacker within range of an affected AP and client may leverage these vulnerabilities to conduct attacks that are dependent on the data confidentiality protocols being used. Attacks may include arbitrary packet decryption and injection, TCP connection hijacking, HTTP content injection, or the replay of unicast and group-addressed frames.

The simplest solution is to install updates provided by your Wi-Fi device vendor.

More on this here:

AntivirusMalwareWindows PC

CCleaner 5.33 and CCleaner Cloud version 1.07.3191 Under Malware Attack

In an article on their website, Piriform, a company recently acquired by Avast, published the following apology.

Dear CCleaner customers, users and supporters,

We would like to apologize for a security incident that we have recently found in CCleaner version 5.33.6162 and CCleaner Cloud version 1.07.3191. A suspicious activity was identified on September 12th, 2017, where we saw an unknown IP address receiving data from software found in version 5.33.6162 of CCleaner, and CCleaner Cloud version 1.07.3191, on 32-bit Windows systems. Based on further analysis, we found that the 5.33.6162 version of CCleaner and the 1.07.3191 version of CCleaner Cloud was illegally modified before it was released to the public, and we started an investigation process. We also immediately contacted law enforcement units and worked with them on resolving the issue. Before delving into the technical details, let me say that the threat has now been resolved in the sense that the rogue server is down, other potential servers are out of the control of the attacker, and we’re moving all existing CCleaner v5.33.6162 users to the latest version. Users of CCleaner Cloud version 1.07.3191 have received an automatic update. In other words, to the best of our knowledge, we were able to disarm the threat before it was able to do any harm.

Technical description
An unauthorized modification of the CCleaner.exe binary resulted in an insertion of a two-stage backdoor capable of running code received from a remote IP address on affected systems.

While more articles on this subject can be found on Spiceworks, a very commendable article about the incident was published by the The Thalos group who first discovered the breach into Avast’s servers.